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Nanolab highlight archive

STNO waveguide “ Nanomagnonic devices based on the spin transfer torque ”, Nature Nanotech. (2014), also featured in this Journal's News and Views . In collaboration with the group of Sergej Demokritov at U. Muenster, we have proposed and demonstrated a nanoscale magnetic device that consists of a spin-torque nanocontact fabricated into a magnetic medium with a profiled thickness. In developing this device, we have introduced the concept of a dipolar field-induced dipolar field-induced magnetic nanowaveguides - magnetic strips with elevated profile whose dipolar fields can confine the propagating spin waves over a frequency range controlled by the geometry of the waveguide.\ This new concept provides a path for the development of magnonic structures that can serve as integrated spin wave-based filters and logic elements. Good spectral matching between the spin waves emitted by the spin-torque nanocontacts with the appropriately profiled waveguides results in efficient emission and directional propagation of spin waves, providing the first building block for the spin torque-driven nanomagnonics.

SHNO “ Spectral characteristics of microwave emission by a spin Hall nano-oscilaltor ”, PRL (2013), also featured in the Physics Viewpoint We have created a nanooscillator utilizing the spin Hall effect to induce microwave-frequency oscillations of a nanoscale magnet, and anisotropic magnetoresistance effect to convert these oscillations into electronic microwave signals. The simple planar structure of the device is amenable to a variety of modifications, providing a path for the studies of electron spin physics in nanoscale systems and development of novel active microwave spintronic nanodevices. Such nanoscale devices can be utilized in microwave communication technologies, as sensitive detectors of dc and microwave fields, and as local signal sources in magnonic devices.

field-effect diode “ Field-effect diode based on electron-induced Mott transition in NdNiO3 APL (2012). In collaboration with the group of Jaques Chakhalian at U. Arkansas and John Freeland at ANL, we have a field-efect device with diode-like electronic characteristics achieved due to the electric field-controlled metal-insulator Mott transition in a complex oxide NdNiO2. Because the metal-insulator transition is of the first order, the electrical characteristics of the device are hysteretic with respect to both the thermal and electrical history of the devices, providing an additional memristive functionality.

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