Roman Baglay

Connie Roth, Advisor

Education

  • Bachelor of Science, New York University, New York, NY, 2011

Research

Local Glass Transition Gradients near Dissmilar Polymer-Polymer Interfaces in Nanostructured Polymeric Materials.

Awards

Recipient of the 2016-2017 Montag Physics Award

Roman Baglay has been awarded the Jim and Ethel Montag Graduate Physics Award for the 2016-2017 academic year.  The Jim and Ethel Montag Graduate Physics Award is awarded annually to an exceptional graduate student for accomplishments in physics research.  Recipients receive an additional $2000 to their stipend the year they receive the award.  The award is granted to the student (US Citizens only) with the most significant accomplishment in research.  The Montag Graduate Physics Award was established by James L. Montag (58C) and his late wife Ethel in honor of Prof. Fereydoon Family, for his mentoring and academic influence of their son Lee Montag (85C).  The 2014-2015 academic year was the first year this award was given.

Roman Baglay recently published two papers in the Journal of Chemical Physics that has attracted considerable attention and influenced the field of polymer physics.  Starting with his Communications in 2015 Journal of Chemical Physics 143, 111101, “Experimentally Determined Profile of Local Glass Transition Temperature Across a Glassy-Rubbery Polymer Interface with a Tg Difference of 80 K”, Roman has experimentally shown that the local glass transition temperature (Tg) profile across dissimilar polymer-polymer interfaces between glassy and rubbery domains are exceptionally broad, spanning hundreds of nanometers, and asymmetric with respect to the composition profile.  These results challenge the traditional textbook view of polymer blends, specifically within nanostructured materials, and has spurred theoretical research by others in the field.  Roman’s work has been highlighted both by the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the third decadal study by the National Science Foundation, Frontiers in Polymer Science and Engineering 2017 report. 

Roman is also a co-author on two other papers from his work at Emory, and another is currently under review.  He has also contributed to two chapters in the recent book on Polymer Glasses (CRC Press, 2016), edited by Connie Roth.  Roman obtained his B.S. in Physics from New York University where he studied quasi-crystalline waveguides and, in conjuncture with ESPCI Paris, worked on developing an apparatus that mimics flock assembly of swarming starlings with self propelled walking particles.  Roman has given many presentations at national and international scientific conferences including the American Physical Society (APS) March meeting, the Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Polymer Physics, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) annual conference about his research at Emory University. 

Publications

R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, “Experimental study of the influence of periodic boundary conditions: Effects of finite size
and faster cooling rates on dissimilar polymer-polymer interfaces,” submitted to ACS Macro Letters.


B.L.T. Kasavan, R.R. Baglay, and C.B. Roth, “Local glass transition temperature Tg(z) profile in polystyrene next to
polybutadiene with and without plasticization effects,” submitted to the Journal of Macromolecular Chemistry and
Physics special issue: Polymer Characterization and Morphology.

R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, “Local glass transition temperature Tg(z) of polystyrene next to different polymers: hard vs.
soft confinement,” Journal of Chemical Physics 2017, 146, 203307.


C.B. Roth, and R.R. Baglay, “Fundamentals of Polymers and Glasses” in Polymer Glasses, edited by C.B. Roth (CRC
Press, 2016).


C.B. Roth, J.E. Pye, and R.R. Baglay, “Correlating Glass Transition and Physical Aging in Thin Polymer Films” in
Polymer Glasses, edited by C.B. Roth (CRC Press, 2016).


R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, "Communication: Experimentally determined profile of local glass transition temperature
across a glassy-rubbery polymer interface with a Tg difference of 80 K," Journal of Chemical Physics 2015, 143, 111101.


P.M. Rauscher, J.E. Pye, R.R. Baglay, and C.B. Roth, "Effect of adjacent rubbery layers on the physical aging of glassy
polymers," Macromolecules 2013, 46, 9806-9817.

Presentations

R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, 2017 American Physical Society March Meeting, New Orleans, LA, “Influence of Finite
System Size, Cooling Rate, and Chain Interpenetration of the Local Glass Transition Temperature Tg(z) Profile in
Polystyrene Next to Different Polymers.”


R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, 2016 American Physical Society March Meeting, Baltimore, MA, “Length Scales of Local
Glass Transition Temperature Gradients under Hard and Soft Confinement.”


R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, 2016 Soft Matter Seminar, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA, “Length Scales of Local Glass
Transition Temperature Gradients Near Soft and Hard Polymer-Polymer Interfaces.” (Invited)


R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, 2016 Southeast Meeting on Soft Materials, Atlanta, GA, “Length Scales of Local Glass
Transition Temperature Gradients near Soft and Hard Polymer-Polymer Interfaces.”


R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, 2015 American Physical Society March Meeting, San Antonio, TX, “Local Glass Transition
Temperature Gradients near Polymer-Polymer Interfaces.”


R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA “Measuring
How the Local Glass Transition Temperature Shifts Across a Glassy-Rubbery Polymer-Polymer Interface.”


R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, 2014 American Physical Society March Meeting, Denver, CO, “Extended Tg Gradient Profile
Across a Glassy-Rubbery Polymer-Polymer Interface with an 80 K Tg Difference.”


R.R. Baglay and C.B. Roth, 2014 Southeast Meeting on Soft Materials, Atlanta, GA, “Extended, Asymmetric Tg Profile
Across a Glassy-Rubbery Polymer-Polymer Interface.”